Tag Archives: Neuroscience

Episode 158 – 19th October 2012

We speak to Kerry McCarthy MP and punk historian John Robb about Pussy Riot, examine an intriguing new study linking brain damage to criminal behaviour, consider votes for 16 year olds and look at the history of the Nobel Prize. We also find out about the new Science Grrl Calendar!



[Direct MP3 Link] [Podcast Feed] [Add to iTunes]

Please Donate & Support the Pod Delusion
Go on, it’s like buying us two drinks a month!

Due to hosting changes from this episode on we’re going to be shouldering the bandwidth costs for hosting the podcasts directly – so please donate and help us keep the Pod Delusion online and free to download!

Pussy Riot Update (3:22) by James O’Malley (ft Kerry McCarthy MP & John Robb)
Brain Damage & Criminality (26:34) by Dean Burnett
Votes at 16 (36:48) by Cory Hazlehurst
Nobel History (45:02) by Kash Farooq (ft Simon Frantz)
Science Grrl Calendar (55:48) by Liz Lutgendorff (ft Heather Williams)
The sketch at the end is by David Lovesy & Brian Two

Follow-Up Links:

Episode 139 – 8th June 2012

We balance the BBC’s horrendous Jubilee coverage with some relentlessly nasty jubilee coverage (ie: we talk reasonably about the Republic protest), we find out all about Workfare, talk about BRAINS, and discover what happened when Hayley complained about some misleading faith healing advertisements.



[Direct MP3 Link] [Podcast Feed] [Add to iTunes]

Please Donate & Support the Pod Delusion
Go on, it’s like buying us two drinks a month!

Due to hosting changes from this episode on we’re going to be shouldering the bandwidth costs for hosting the podcasts directly – so please donate and help us keep the Pod Delusion online and free to download!

Get A Free Audio Book From Audible
We’re trialling partnering with Audible – sign up and get a free trial and you’ll get a FREE AUDIOBOOK! And you’ll also be helping the Pod Delusion, which is nice. Available audiobooks include Sam Harris’s Moral Landscape and Ben Goldacre’s Bad Science. Sign up here.

Republic Protest (2:50) by James O’Malley (ft Jim Jepps and James Gray)
Workfare (17:24) by Cory Hazlehurst
Enlightenment Cafe Update (25:16) by James O’Malley
(ft Andy Franzkowiac and Claire Benson)
HOTS Faith Healing (30:44) by Hayley Stevens
Brainy Chat (41:49) by Dean Burnett (ft Barry Gibb)
The sketch at the end is by David Lovesy and Brian Two

Follow-Up Links:

Episode 124 – 24th February 2012

This week we find out about the counter campaign to the awful Coalition For Marriage, discover how religious extremists are targeting university campuses to recruit students, find out if the government’s new alcohol advice stands up to scrutiny and reminisce about 2000AD at 25. We also come closer to answering the age-old question… are the colours we perceive the same as the colours other people do?


[Direct MP3 Link] [Podcast Feed] [Add to iTunes]

Please Donate & Support the Pod Delusion
Go on, it’s like buying us two drinks a month!

Coalition for Equal Marriage (2:50) by James O’Malley (ft Conor Marron)
Extremism on Campus (11:48) by James O’Malley (ft Raheem Kassam)
Leading Faiths (25:36) by Drew Rae
Alcohol Limits (29:20) by Adam Jacobs
Bad Valentines PR (37:25) by Marsh
2000AD at 35 (43:28) by Tom Hodden
Lottolab (50:40) by James O’Malley (ft David Robertson)
The sketch at the end is by David Lovesy and Brian Two

Follow-Up Links:

CineSci6 – Memento (2000)

CineSci6 is a series of events at Clapham Picture House exploring the science behind some classic films by first screening the film, and then having the science writer Simon Frantz discuss the film with an expert. You can find out more about how to attend the events on the Science in the Pub website.

In this 6th podcast, Simon Frantz discusses Christopher Nolan’s 2000 film Memento. He is joined by Guardian neuroscience blogger Mo Costandi and Hugo Spiers, who researches spatial cognition, memory and goal-directed behaviour at UCL.


[Podcast Feed] [The Pod Delusion]

CineSci6 is organised by James Robson and Paolo Viscardi, and facilitated by Kate Coventry. The discussion is led by Simon Frantz.